FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS

DRUID19 Copenhagen

June 19-21, Copenhagen Business School (Denmark)

Submission deadline: March 1, 2019

Since 1996, DRUID has become one of the world’s premier academic conferences on innovation and the dynamics of structural, institutional and geographic change. DRUID is proud to invite senior and junior scholars to participate and contribute with a paper to DRUID19, hosted by Copenhagen Business School. Presenting distinguished plenary speakers, a range of parallel paper sessions, and an attractive social program, the conference aims at mapping theoretical, empirical and methodological advances, contributing novel insights, and help identifying scholarly positions, divisions, and common grounds in current scientific controversies within the field.

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Keynotes delivered by top scholars from innovation studies, management, economic geography, and numerous other research fields.  Plenary speakers at DRUID19 include Stefano BrusoniDimo DimovNilanjana DuttAnnabel GawerMartine HaasAdam B. Jaffe, Michael G. Jacobides, Sarah Kaplan and Dan Levinthal.

DRUID Debates with outstanding scholars exchanging opinions in a heated and entertaining setting, and the conference audience opposing or supporting their standpoints.  DRUID19 Debates challenge the ‘Eco-systems’ approach and ‘Design Thinking’.

Paper sessions presenting 200 peer reviewed papers with previously unpublished research, all with engaged session chairs and carefully appointed discussants. DRUID19 invites paper submissions on innovation, entrepreneurship and other aspects of structural, institutional and geographic change, such as

  • Open innovation, search strategies and knowledge sourcing
  • Markets for technology and knowledge labor
  • Entrepreneurship and growth
  • Creativity, R&D management and organizational behavior
  • Scientific knowledge production
and university-industry interaction
  • Local, regional and global geographies of innovation, innovation networks and connectedness
  • Institutional, social and frugal innovation and entrepreneurship
  • Eco-innovation, sustainability, inequality and inclusion

In particular, DRUID invites papers with new, mixed, or multi-disciplinary theoretical approaches or innovative methods that will benefit from the open-ended discussions at DRUID.

Best paper awards. Accepted papers authored or co-authored by doctoral students will be considered for the Steven Klepper Award for Best Young Scholar Paper while all papers accepted for the conference will be considered for the DRUID Best Paper Award.

The grand DRUID Dinner is known for its excellent food and high fun factor. This year we will enjoy New Nordic cuisine and the atmosphere in the historic warehouse in Copenhagen harbor where NOMA and the New Nordic food revolution were kicked off.

DRUID Discoveries excursions will make the most out of Copenhagen and invite participants on trips to the most happening parts of city.

DRUID Decadence. A DRUID institution, the afterparty will find DRUIDs dining, drinking and dancing the night away in a clandestine garden amongst the city ramparts, before joining the locals for a nightcap in the historical old harbor quarters.

PDWs

Professional development workshops (PDWs) are focused, user driven sessions offering a way of sharing ideas, knowledge and expertise with peers in the DRUID community and develop new ideas and projects. PDWs at DRUID19 take place 9.00-12.00 on June 19, 2019.

All participants to DRUID19 can propose a PDW focused on a specific research subfield and/or targeting a specific group, e.g. PhD students, junior faculty, empiricists, theorists, etc. Proposals must contain 1) a max. 2 page description of the activity planned for the workshop; 2) a tentative program with a duration of up to 3 hours; 3) the maximum number of participants for the workshop (rooms are available for 20 up to 75 participants); and 4) a list of confirmed speakers; 5) a brief CV of key applicant(s) and speakers. Please send proposals to at pdw19@druid.dk no later than April 8, 2019. Applicants will be notified of the decision by April 20, 2019, and all accepted PDWs will be advertised and included in the DRUID19 program. Speakers and participants must register for the DRUID19 conference.

PAPER SUBMISSIONS AND DEADLINES

DRUID19 provides an opportunity to take stock of our field and jointly to advance the research frontier. Thus, only previously unpublished research is eligible for presentation and the conference particularly invites research with new, mixed, and multi-disciplinary theoretical approaches and novel methods. Scholars who wish to present their research at the conference must upload a full paper (in PDF, anonymized) not exceeding 12,000 words (including notes, tables, appendices, list of references, etc.) through the website www.druid.dk no later than March 1, 2019 (before midnight at the scholar’s location). Submission of a paper grants permission to DRUID to include it in the conference material and to place it temporarily on the conference website. DRUID reserves the right to use available software to control for plagiarism and to take appropriate action in severe cases. Details are available under Terms and Conditions on the website.

All submissions undergo double-blinded reviews by at least two independent reviewers with respect to novelty, academic quality and the paper’s relation to the themes of the conference. Decisions of paper acceptance are given April 20, 2019. No review or comments will be offered to the author or authors to supplement the decision. Papers not accepted for oral presentation at the conference may be accepted for presentation in a poster session. Authors of accepted papers/posters must pay the conference fee before Monday May 6, 2019, or their paper/poster will automatically be removed from the conference program and website. Revised versions of accepted papers/posters may be uploaded until June 1, 2019. The final conference program will be available June 1, 2019.

Authors may submit more than one paper but each conference participant will only be allowed to present one paper. Co-authored papers may be presented by any of the participating co-authors.

REGISTRATION

The DRUID website www.druid.dk is open for registration from April 1, 2019. Besides registration, the conference fee includes the grand conference dinner, lunch on June 20 and 21, and coffee and snacks/fruit during breaks all days. Sponsorships from the partner universities have enabled an early-bird conference fee (applicable until May 6, 2019) of 510 EUR. After May 6, 2019, the latecomer conference fee will be 610 EUR. There is a permanent 50% discount for doctoral students.

The website will remain open for payment of the conference fee until June 19, 2019. However, authors of accepted papers and posters must pay the fee before May 6, 2019, for their paper or poster to be included in the conference program.

DRUID GOES GREENER

Aiming to lower the carbon footprint of its biannual conferences, DRUID sources environmentally friendly food and conference materials. Furthermore, DRUID offsets 1 ton CO2 for each DRUID19 delegate, covering an estimated 120% of the conference’s carbon footprint of catering, venue, lodging and local transport.

Upon registering for DRUID19, each conference delegate will be offered a cheap and certified way (Vertified Carbon Standard and Gold Standard) of offsetting the individual carbon footprint for air travel to Copenhagen.

INFORMATION IN BRIEF

Dates: DRUID19 will be June 19-21, back-to-back with the Academy of International Business (AIB) 2019 Annual Meeting at Copenhagen Business School, June 24-27.

Website and registration: www.druid.dk

Contact: DRUID19@druid.dk

Facebook: facebook.com/DRUIDsociety

Twitter: twitter.com/DRUIDsociety

Hashtag: #DRUID19

Videos: vimeo.com/DRUIDsociety

Photos: flickr.com/DRUIDsociety

Mailing list: To subscribe, email DRUID19@druid.dk with the word “Subscribe” in the subject field

DRUID19 back-to-back with the AIB 2019 Annual Meeting

AIB 2019 Copenhagen

DRUID19 will be held at Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, June 19-21. See the Early Announcement for the conference.

DRUID19 will be back-to-back with the AIB 2019 Annual Meeting at Copenhagen Business School, June 24-27. For more information on the AIB 2019 Annual Meeting, see https://aib.msu.edu/events/2019/

AIB 2019 organizes a “Global Innovation and Knowledge Management” track of particular interest for DRUIDs.

Global innovation and knowledge management

Track Chair:
Felipe Monteiro, INSEAD, France ( felipe.monteiro@insead.edu )
Michael Mol, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark ( mmo.smg@cbs.dk )

The creation, transfer and outcomes of knowledge are central to our theories of the MNE. This track deals with the technological and organizational generation, transfer and outcomes of new knowledge. It examines the internal and external aspects of innovation activities, with the internal aspects being focused on knowledge generation and transfer within the MNE, and the external being focused on contractual and equity-based collaborations with international partners. It also examines the changing geography of innovation, the access of the multinational firm to location bound sources of innovation, and the influence of national and regional innovation systems.

Keywords: Networks for innovation; Global and local knowledge; Technology management; Technology scouting; Knowledge search; Knowledge creation and diffusion; Knowledge sharing; Organizational learning; Exploration vs. exploitation; Product innovation; Process innovation; Business model innovation; Management innovation; Open innovation; Knowledge governance mechanisms; R&D subsidiaries; National and regional innovation systems; Reverse innovation; Indigenous innovation; Centers of excellence; Innovation clusters; R&D offshoring; Licensing; Learning alliances; University-MNE relationships; Intra-firm inventor mobility; Dispersed Innovation

Submission deadline for AIB 2019: November 28, 2018, here:
https://aib.msu.edu/events/2019/SubmissionInstructions.asp

DRUID and the climate crisis

Promoting the green research agenda

For a decade, DRUID has presented panels and promoted papers and special issues on “Eco-Innovation”, green technology adoption and fundamental research into new technologies that may help alleviating the climate crisis. In the future, DRUID will further promote research within this agenda.

Minimizing the carbon footprint of the DRUID events

On a practical level, in is the ambition of DRUID to minimize the carbon footprint of its biannual conferences. Working with local suppliers, DRUID seeks to source environmentally friendly food and conference materials, and maximize the use of recyclable materials, including water bottles.  Furthermore, DRUID now offsets the carbon footprint of its conference activities.  For each conference, DRUID offsets 1 tonne of CO2 per conference delegate for catering, venue use, lodging, and local transport. In addition, for each conference, DRUID estimates the carbon footprint of each conference delegate’s air travel from home country to the conference venue. DRUID then obtains sponsorships to offset the carbon footprint of all travel to the conference, and if sponsors are unavailable,  offers each conference delegate a convenient way to buy individual carbon offsets for air travel upon registering for a DRUID conference.

For the DRUID18 conference in Copenhagen, June 11-13 2018, DRUID offset 282 metric tonnes of CO2 for catering, venue use, lodging and local transport, plus 243 metric tonnes of CO2 for conference delegates’ air travel. As a result, DRUID18’s carbon footprint was offset with an estimated 120%.

 

Carbon offsets are undertaken in collaboration with a small Danish startup, Vitapus, offering CO2 offsets certified with Vertified Carbon Standard and Gold Standard.

 

Winner of the Industry & Innovation DRUID Award for Best Paper 2018

DRUID18, Copenhagen, June 11-13, 2018

The award is biannual and given to the most innovative and high-quality paper published by Industry and Innovation in the previous two years. The award consists of 1000 EUR (sponsored by Taylor and Francis) plus free access to the DRUID June conference for one author (sponsored by DRUID).

Trademark or patent? The effects of market concentration, customer type and venture capital financing on start-ups’ initial IP applications

Industry and Innovation, 24:4 (2017), 325-345.

Geertjan De Vries
Enrico Pennings
Joern H. Block
Christian Fisch

Christoph Grimpe, Christian Fisch, Mark Lorenzen

ABSTRACT: We analyse the initial IP applications of 4,703 start-ups in the U.S., distinguishing between trademark and patent applications. Our empirical results show that start-ups are more likely to file for trademarks instead of patents when entering markets with a higher market concentration. Furthermore, we find that start-ups that are primarily active in business-to-consumer markets instead of business-to-business markets are more likely to file trademarks. Finally, the involvement of a venture capitalist (VC) affects the initial IP application. VC-backed start-ups are more likely than other startups to file initial IP in the form of trademarks rather than patents. This paper contributes to research on the use of IP rights in start-ups and to the literature on new venture strategy.

Winner of the DRUID Steven Klepper Award for Best Young Scholar Paper 2018

DRUID18, Copenhagen, June 11-13, 2018

Achieving Strategic and Financial Returns: The Challenge of Corporate Venture Capital Investors

Susanne Koster, IESE Business School, Strategic Management

Mark Lorenzen, Valentina Tartari, Susanne Koster

ABSTRACT: Why are corporate investors able to generate either strategic or financial returns separately but not both types of returns jointly? Building upon the financial contract theory, I conceptualize corporate venture capital investing as a hybrid investment model in which corporate investors gain strategic returns by commercializing a venture’s knowledge, and financial returns by exiting the investment through an IPO or an acquisition by another firm. The model predicts a negative relationship between the strategic and financial returns. Corporate investors may exit an investment that does not generate a strategic return and keep an investment in the portfolio when exiting an investment leads to a loss of access to the venture. Using a sample of 18 corporate investors in the chemical industry that invested in 567 ventures, I find a negative correlation between the probability that an investment generates a knowledge transfer from the venture to the corporate investor and the probability to exit an investment. An investment that generates a knowledge transfer negatively affects the odds of exiting versus keeping the investment in the CVC portfolio. The technological distance between the venture and the corporate investor, the size of the syndicate, and the mode of exit (IPO or acquisition) affect the trade-off between exiting and keeping the investment in the CVC portfolio.

Winner of the DRUID Best Paper Award 2018


DRUID18, Copenhagen, June 11-13, 2018

Science is Shaped by Wikipedia: Evidence From a Randomized Control Trial

Neil C Thompson, Sloan School of Management, TIES
Douglas Hanley, University of Pittsburgh, Economics

 

Neil C Thompson, Kristina Vaarst Andersen, Mark Lorenzen

ABSTRACT: As the largest encyclopedia in the world, it is not surprising that Wikipedia reflects the state of scientific knowledge. However, Wikipedia is also one of the most accessed websites in the world, including by scientists, which suggests that it also has the potential to shape science. This paper shows that it does. Incorporating ideas into Wikipedia leads to those ideas being used more in the scientific literature. We provide correlational evidence of this across thousands of Wikipedia articles and causal evidence of it through a randomized control trial where we add new scientific content to Wikipedia. We find that the causal impact is strong, with Wikipedia influencing roughly one in every 830 words in related scientific journal articles. We also find causal evidence that the scientific articles referenced in Wikipedia receive more citations, suggesting that Wikipedia complements the traditional journal system by pointing researchers to key underlying scientific articles. Our findings speak not only to the influence of Wikipedia, but more broadly to the influence of repositories of scientific knowledge and the role that they play in the creation of scientific knowledge.

DRUID18 Copenhagen


First Call for Papers

Download as PDF

Copenhagen, Denmark, June 11-13, 2018
Submission deadline March 1, 2018

Since 1996, DRUID has become one of the world’s premier academic conferences on innovation and the dynamics of structural, institutional and geographic change. DRUID is proud to invite senior and junior scholars to participate and contribute with a paper to DRUID18, hosted by Copenhagen Business School. Presenting distinguished plenary speakers, a range of parallel paper sessions, and an attractive social program, the conference aims at mapping theoretical, empirical and methodological advances, contributing novel insights, and help identifying scholarly positions, divisions, and common grounds in current scientific controversies within the field.

Conference highlights

Plenary speakers at DRUID18 include Ashish Arora, Aija Leiponen, Lori Rosenkopf, Bruce Tether, Brian Uzzi and Reinhilde Veugelers.

DRUID Debates with outstanding scholars exchanging opinions in a heated and entertaining setting, and the conference audience opposing or supporting their standpoints.  DRUID18 Debates challenge the focus on ‘star scientists’ and the usefulness of Community Innovation Survey data.

Paper sessions presenting 200 peer reviewed papers with previously unpublished research, all with engaged session chairs and carefully appointed discussants. DRUID18 invites paper submissions on innovation, entrepreneurship and other aspects of structural, institutional and geographic change, such as

  • Open innovation, search strategies and knowledge sourcing
  • Markets for technology and knowledge labor
  • Entrepreneurship and growth
  • Creativity, R&D management and organizational behavior
  • Scientific knowledge production
and university-industry interaction
  • Local, regional and global geographies of innovation, innovation networks and connectedness
  • Institutional, social and frugal innovation and entrepreneurship
  • Eco-innovation, sustainability, inequality and inclusion

In particular, DRUID invites papers with new, mixed, or multi-disciplinary theoretical approaches or innovative methods that will benefit from the open-ended discussions at DRUID.

Best paper awards. Accepted papers authored or co-authored by doctoral students will be considered for the Steven Klepper Award for Best Young Scholar Paper while all papers accepted for the conference will be considered for the DRUID Best Paper Award.

The grand DRUID Dinner is known for its excellent food and high fun factor. This year we will enjoy New Nordic cuisine and the atmosphere in the historic warehouse in Copenhagen harbor where the New Nordic food revolution was kicked off.

DRUID Discoveries excursions will make the most out of Copenhagen and invite participants on trips to the most happening parts of city.

DRUID Decadence. A DRUID institution, the afterparty will find DRUIDs dining, drinking and dancing the night away in a clandestine garden amongst the city ramparts, before joining the locals for a nightcap in the historical old harbor quarters.

PDWs

Professional development workshops (PDWs) are focused, user driven sessions offering a way of sharing ideas, knowledge and expertise with peers in the DRUID community and develop new ideas and projects. PDWs at DRUID18 take place 9.00-12.00 on June 11, 2018. All participants to DRUID18 can propose a PDW focused on a specific research subfield and/or targeting a specific group, e.g. PhD students, junior faculty, empiricists, theorists, etc. Proposals must contain 1) a max. 2 page description of the activity planned for the workshop; 2) a tentative program with a duration of up to 3 hours; 3) the maximum number of participants for the workshop (rooms are available for 20 up to 75 participants); and 4) a list of confirmed speakers; 5) a brief CV of key applicant(s) and speakers. Please send proposals to at pdw18@druid.dk no later than March 1, 2018. Applicants will be notified of the decision by March 20, 2018, and all accepted PDWs will be advertised and included in the DRUID18 program. Speakers and participants must register for the DRUID18 conference.

Paper submissions and deadlines

DRUID18 provides an opportunity to take stock of our field and jointly to advance the research frontier. Thus, only previously unpublished research is eligible for presentation and the conference particularly invites research with new, mixed, and multi-disciplinary theoretical approaches and novel methods. Scholars who wish to present their research at the conference must upload a full paper (in PDF, anonymized) not exceeding 12,000 words (including notes, tables, appendices, list of references, etc.) through the website www.druid.dk no later than March 1, 2018 (before midnight at the scholar’s location). Submission of a paper grants permission to DRUID to include it in the conference material and to place it temporarily on the conference website. DRUID reserves the right to use available software to control for plagiarism and to take appropriate action in severe cases. Details are available under Terms and Conditions on the website.

All submissions undergo double-blinded reviews by at least two independent reviewers with respect to novelty, academic quality and the paper’s relation to the themes of the conference. Decisions of paper acceptance are given April 20, 2018. No review or comments will be offered to the author or authors to supplement the decision. Papers not accepted for oral presentation at the conference may be accepted for presentation in a poster session. Authors of accepted papers/posters must pay the conference fee before May 1, 2018, or their paper/poster will automatically be removed from the conference program and website. Revised versions of accepted papers/posters may be uploaded until June 1, 2018. The final conference program will be available June 1, 2018.

Authors may submit more than one paper but each conference participant will only be allowed to present one paper. Co-authored papers may be presented by any of the participating co-authors.

Registration

The DRUID website www.druid.dk is open for registration from February 1, 2018. Besides registration, the conference fee includes the grand conference dinner, lunch on June 12 and 13, and coffee and snacks/fruit during breaks all days. Sponsorships from the partner universities have enabled an early-bird conference fee (applicable until May 1, 2018) of 500 EUR. After May 1, 2018, the latecomer conference fee will be 600 EUR. There is a permanent 50% discount for doctoral students.

The website will remain open for payment of the conference fee until June 10, 2018. However, authors of accepted papers and posters must pay the fee before May 1, 2018, for their paper or poster to be included in the conference program.

Information in brief

Website and registration: www.druid.dk
Contact: DRUID18@druid.dk
Facebook: facebook.com/DRUIDsociety
Twitter: twitter.com/DRUIDsociety
Hashtag: #DRUID18
Videos: vimeo.com/DRUIDsociety
Photos: flickr.com/DRUIDsociety
Mailing list: To subscribe, email DRUID18@druid.dk with the word “Subscribe” in the subject field

 

 

 

 

Winner of the DRUID Steven Klepper Award for Best Young Scholar Paper 2017

DRUID17, New York, June 13 – 15, 2017

Is Wisdom of the Crowd a Positive Signal? Effects of Crowd-Financing on Subsequent Venture Capital Selection  

Michael Maximilian Moedl
Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract: We examine the impact and signaling effects that prefunding has on subsequent venture capital funding rounds. The seed funding gap is still a major obstacle for the initiation of new ventures. Crowdfinancing – an innovation in the market for startup finance – could be a possible market-based option to partly close this gap. However, crowdfinancing cannot be regarded as a substitute for venture capital or business angel funding, e.g. since it is not likely to fully finance a new venture over time. It therefore appears important to study the interaction between crowdfinancing and more traditional forms of startup finance. Drawing on a choice experimental design and data on 5,280 decisions of 120 venture investors, our results indicate that “the crowd” generally is a negative signal for professional venture investors, but that they do not ignore positive signals sent by the crowd. We find causal evidence that crowd-investing (securities-based crowdfunding) is in general regarded as highly negative by venture capitalists, while high sums of (reward-based) crowdfunding, collected fast by startups with a B2C business model, can have a positive effect on VC managers’ funding decisions Our results also suggest that traditional forms of prefunding, i.e., prior business angel investments, by contrast significantly increase the likelihood of subsequent financing rounds. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Winners of the DRUID Best Paper Award 2017

DRUID17, New York, June 13 – 15, 2017

How National Science Foundation Rotators Build Up the Ability of their Colleagues to Attract Research Resources 

Christos Kolympiris

School of Management, University of Bath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sebastian Hoenen

Management Studies, Wageningen University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract: We study whether scientists who move out of academia temporarily, affect their colleagues’ ability to attract research resources. To do so we are the first to exploit the National Science Foundation (NSF) rotation program under which NSF employs academics, called rotators, on loan from their university, to lead its peer review. We ask whether rotators upon return to their academic institution cause their colleagues to increase their NSF funding acquisition. Using difference-in-difference estimations we reveal causal evidence that rotator’s colleagues without NSF funding ex-ante raise approximately $120,000 more than similar scientists in similar academic units, identified via Coarsened Exact Matching, who do not have a rotator colleague ex-post. This effect strengthens with rotator’s helpfulness and tenure at their institution. Numerous tests and interviews ruling out competing explanations suggest that knowledge transfer from the rotator including hints on topics NSF is keen on funding is the causal mechanism driving the results.

DRUID keynotes

See the most recent DRUID keynotes in hi-res video.

Zoltán J. Acs, David B. Audretch, Pontus Braunerhjelm and Bo Carlsson: The Missing Link: The Knowledge Filter and Endogenous Growth (2003)

Zoltán J. Acs: The Global Entrepreneurship and Development Index (2010)

Ron Adner: Entry Timing and Performance in Innovation Ecosystems: Evidence from the optical photolithography industry, 1962-2004 (2006)

Allan Afuah: Technological Change and the Negative Effects of Embeddedness (2007)

Rajshree Agarwal: The Process of Creative Construction: Implications for 
Knowledge Management, Strategic Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth (2008)

Rajshree Agarwal: The emergence of new industries and firms: Stylized facts and unresolved theoretical issues (2014)

Gautam Ahuja: Technology Search Behavior in the Semiconductor Industry(2006)

Gautam Ahuja: New Frontiers in Strategy and Innovation Research (2012)

Howard E. Aldrich: Lost in Translation: Cultural Codes are not Blueprints (2011)

Bruno Amable and Pascal Petit: On Institutions, Innovation and Growth (1999)

Jaideep Anand: Does Experience imply learning? (2010)

Birgitte Andersen and Vivien Walsh: Co-Evolution of Technological Systems, Blurring of Industry Boundaries, and Broadening of Competences in the Chemical Industry (1998)

Esben S. Andersen and Morris Teubal: The Transformation of Innovation Systems: Towards a Policy Perspective (1999)

Linda Argote: Transactive memory systems, performance and innovation (2016)

Melissa M. Appleyard: Knowledge Meshing through Interdisciplinary R&D: The case of the U.S. NIH Nanomedicine 
 Development Centers (2011)

Nicholas Argyres: Contractual Commitments, Bargainining Power, and Governance Inseperability:Incorporating History into the Transaction Cost Theory of Firm (1998)

Rodrigo Arocena and Judith Sutz: Looking at National Systems of Innovation from the South (1999)

Ashish Arora: Innovative and Selective Capabilities in Pharmaceutical R&D (2006)

Suma Athreye and John Cantwell: Inequality in the Global Production of Technology and the Technological Catch-up of Nations (2004)

David Audretsch: Nascent Entrepreneurs, Innovation and External Finance (2007)

Carliss Y. Baldwin: Modeling a Paradigm Shift: From Producer Innovation to User and Open Collaborative Innovation (2010)

Jay B. Barney: Transaction Costs, Real Options, Learning and Property Rights (1998)

Joel A. C. Baum: The Skewed Few: Does high impact signal quality among journals, articles, and academics in management? (2012)

Jane Banaszak-Holl, Will Mitchell, Joel A. C. Baum and Whitney B. Berta: Chain-to-component Transfer Learning in Multiunit Chains: U.S. Nursing Homes, 1991-1997 (2003)

Mary Benner: Exploration, exploitation, and analysts: Are firms rewarded for ambidexterity? (2013)

Janet Bercovitz and Maryann Feldmann: Technology Transfer and the Academic Department: Who participates and why? (2003)

Janet Bercovitz and Maryann Feldman: Fishing Upstream: Firm Innovation Strategy and University Research Alliances (2005)

Ron Boschma: Related variety and regional growth in Italy (2007)

Thomas Brenner: Factors and Mechanisms Causing the Emergence of Local Industrial Clusters – A Meta-Study of 159 Cases (2007)

Timothy Bresnahan, Alfonso Gambardella and Annalee Saxenian: Old 
Economy Inputs for New Economy Outputs: Rise and Growth of the New Silicon Valleys (2002)

Eric Brousseau: Internet Regulation: Does Self-Regulation Require an Institutional Framework? (2002)

Diane Burton: Entrepreneurship and Employment: Job Creation, Job Quality and Career Trajectories (2013)

John Cantwell and Ram Mudambi : On the nature of knowledge creation in MNE subsidiaries: An empirical analysis using patent data (2003)

Kenneth I. Carlaw and Richard G. Lipsey: Externalities versus Technological Complementarities: a model of GPT-driven, sustained growth (2001)

Bo Carlsson: Competition and Industrial Dynamics: Innovation, Entry, and Spillovers (1997)

Bo Carlsson: The new economy: What is new and what is not? (2002)

Bo Carlsson: Industrial Dynamics: A Review of the Literature 1985-2000 (2008)

Bo Carlsson, Staffan Jacobsson, Magnus Holmen & Annika Rickne: Innovation Systems: Analytical and Methodological Issues (1999)

Bo Carlsson and Bengt-Åke Lundvall:
Industrial Dynamics Revisited: What Have We Learned? (1998)

Mark Casson: An Entrepreneurial Theory of the Firm (1998)

Mario Cimoli and Jorge Katz: Structural Reforms, Technological Gaps and Economic Development. A Latin American Perspective in the 1990’s (2001)

Wesley M. Cohen: View from the Bench: Patents, licensing and upstream biomedical innovation (2006)

Wesley M. Cohen: Reflections on Fifty Years of Empirical Studies of the Economics of Innovative Activity and Performance (2013)

Russell Coff: The Co-evolution of Rent Appropriation and Capability Development (2009)

Patrick Cohendet and Patrick Llerna: Routines, Communities and Organizational Capabilities (2001)

Massimo Colombo: The Choice of the Form of Strategic Alliances: Transaction Cost Economics and Beyond (1998)

Massimo Colombo: the Managerial Professionalization of High-Tech Entrepreneurial Ventures: The Determinants of the Creation of a Middle-Management Layer (2009)

Massimo Colombo and Paola Carrone: Capabilities in the Multimedia Regime: The case of Telecommunications Operators (1997)

Philip N. Cooke: Networks and Hierarchies in Bioscientific Knowledge Management (2003)

Philip N. Cooke: Transition Regions: Green Innovation and Economic Development (2009)

Rod Coombs and Stan Metcalfe: Distributed Capabilities and the Governance of the Firm (1998)

Benjamin Coriat: Firms, competition and selection: Strengths and limits of the Evolutionary Approach (1997)

Benjamin Coriat and Olivier Weinstein: Organization and Institutions in the Innovation Generation – Towards a theory of “Corporate Systems of Innovation (1999)

Benjamin Coriat, Fabienne Orsi and Olivier Weinstein: Science Based Sectors and Institutional Arrangements: From Science Based “1” to Science Based “2” Regimes (2002)

Robin Cowan, Paul A. David and Dominique Foray: The explicit economics of knowledge codification and tacitness (1999)

Jacques de Bandt: Competence and Organizational Learning Requirements for Complex Knowledge Production (1998)

Jacques De Bandt: Productivity in and through Knowledge Production (2000)

Pablo D’Este and Pari Patel: University – Industry linkages in the UK: what are the factors determining the variety of university researchers’ interactions with industry? (2005)

Timothy M. Devinney, David F. Midgley and Christine W. Soo:
Do Firms Learn from Their Mistakes? Exploring the Effects of Knowledge Sourcing and Absorptive Capacity on Project-Level Learning (2003)

Ludovic Dibiaggio: Technological Platforms, Business Diversification and Economic Performance (2009)

Giovanni Dosi: Learning to Govern and Learning to Solve Problems (1998)

Giovanni Dosi, Guilio Bottazzi, Marco Lippi, Fabio Pammoli and Massimo Riccaboni: Processes of corporate growth in the evolution of an innovation driven industry – the case of Parmaceuticals (2000)

Giovanni Dosi, Daniel Levinthal and Luigi Marengo: Bridging Contested Terrain: Linking Incentive-based and Learning Perspectives on Organizational Evolution (2001)

Giovanni Dosi and Orietta Marsili: Industrial Structures and Dynamics: Evidence, Interpretation and Puzzles (1997)

Deborah Dougherty: Learning for Innovation in Science-Based Industries. The Case of Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery (2006)

Charles Edquist: Innovation Policy: A Systemic Approach (1999)

Kathleen Eisenhardt: Complexity Theory, Market Dynamism, and the Strategy of Simple Rules (2007)

Gunnar Eliasson: The Nature of Economic Change and Management in the Knowledge-Based Information Economy (1998)

Dieter Ernst: High-Tech Competition Puzzles. How Globalization Affects Firm Behavior and Market Structure in the Electronics Industry (1997)

Dieter Ernst: What Permits Small Firms to Compete in High-Tech Industries? (1998)

Jan Fagerberg: The Future of Innovation Studies (2009)

Jan Fagerberg and Bart Verspagen: The technology gap approach reexamined (2001)

Terence P. C. Fan: Relation-specific creative performance in voluntary collaborations: A micro-foundation for competitive advantage? (2011)

Ernst Fehr: The engineering of cooperative social norms (2014)

Maryann Feldman: Locational dynamics of the biotech industry (2002)

Simoni Ferriani: The Social Structure of Creativity: Social Networks and Rewards in the Hollywood Film Industry (2010)

Richard Florida: Creativity, Innovation and Inequality (2015)

Dominique Foray: Various Roads towards the Knowledge-based Economy? (2000)

Dominique Foray and David Hargreaves: The development of knowledge of different 
sectors: a model and some hypotheses (2002)

Dominique Foray and Edward W. Steinmueller: Replication of routine, the domestication of tacit knowledge and the economics of inscription technology: A Brave New World? (2001)

Andrea Fosfuri: Managing Licensing in the Market for Technology (2009)

Tim Foxon: Climate Change Mitigation Policies: Transforming Innovation Systems for Eco-innovation 
(2009)

Martin Fransman: Analysing the Evolution of Industry: the Relevance of the Telecommunications Industry (1998)

Chiara Franzoni: Scientists on the move? Evidence and future directions of research on the international mobility of researchers (2017)

Paul Geroski: The Growth of Firms in Theory and Practice (1998)

Paul Geroski and Mariana Mazzucato: Learning and the Sources of Corporate Growth (2001)

Alfonso Gambardella: Ideas for Rent: An Overview of Markets for 
Technology (2008)

Alfonso Gambardella: Strategies for inventing: How large numbers can affect cherry-picking (2011)

Meric S. Gertler: “Buzz without being there? (2008)

Meric S. Gertler and Yael Levitte : Local Nodes in Global Networks: The Geography of Knowledge Flows in Biotechnology Innovation (2003)

Marco Giarratana: Contagion effects in portfolios of diversified firms: The distinct role of non- scale vs. scale free resources (2017)

Michelle Gittelman: Does geography matter for science-based firms? Epistemic communities and the geography of research and patenting in biotechnology (2006)

Michelle Gittelman and Bruce Kogut: Does Good Science Lead to Valuable 
Knowledge? Biotechnology Firms and the Evolutionary Logic of Citation Patterns (2002)

Edward Glaeser: Cities as Agents of Change (2017)

Ove Granstrand: The Economics and Management of Evolutionary Knowledge Diversification
(2001)

Isin Guler: Transferability of Home-Country Advantages in Cross-Border Venture Capital Investments: The Case of Status and Experience (2015)

Martine Haas: Building Expertise for Innovation Inside Firms: Collaboration, Careers & Contexts (2019)

Bronwyn Hall and Raffaele Oriani : Does the Market Value R&D Investment by 
European Firms? Evidence from a Panel of Manufacturing Firms in France, 
Germany and Italy (2003)

Stephan Heblich and Oliver Falck: The Lifecycle Of Regions (2008)

Joachim Henkell: Patent Trolls on Markets for Technology – An Empirical Analysis of Trolls’ Patent Acquisitions (2010)

Martin Svensson Henning and Frank Neffke: Varying agglomeration externalities over the course of the industry life cycle (2008)

David Hsu: The Signaling Value of Patents: Evidence from Semiconductor Start-ups (2007)

Alan Hughes: Universities and the Commercialisation of Science: Retrospect and Prospect (2009)

Michael Jacobides: Playing Football on a Soccer Field: Value Chain Structures, Institutional Modularity and Foreign Expansion (2005)

Adam B. JaffeReinventing the Elder Workforce: Evidence on Age and Creativity (2019)

Justin J.P. Jansen, Frans A.J. Van den Bosch and Henk W. Volberda: Managing Potential and Realized Absorptive Capacity: Antecedents and Consequences (2003)

Lars Bo Jeppesen: Attracting Needles from the Haystack: the Importance of Marginality in a Broadcast Search and Solution Attraction Problem Solving Process
(2007)

David Kaplan: The New National R&D Strategy for South Africa: An Appraisal (2004)

Riitta Katila and Scott Shane: When does lack of resources make new firms Innovate? (2005)

Jorge Katz: Latin America at a cross road: the need for an alternative growth strategy (2004)

Neil Kay: Some Rude Thoughts on the Growth of Firms (1998)

René Kemp: From End-of-Pipe to System Innovation. the Implications for Policy (2009)

Martin Kenney: National Exceptionalism?: The Importance of Context in Shaping the Birth 
of the U.S.Internet Industry (2002)

Martin Kilduff: The Production of New Knowledge in Organizations: A Philosophy of Science Approach  (2010)

Steven Klepper: Firm Capabilities and Industry Evolution  (2001)

Steven Klepper: Intra-industry Spinoffs and the Formation of Clusters (2008)

Tobias Kretschmer: Product Line Extension in Hypercompetitive Environments – Evidence From the US Video Game Industry (2009)

Alice Lam: Work roles and careers of R&D scientists in network organizations (2004)

Richard N. Langlois: Capabilities and Governance: the Rebirth of Production in the Theory of Economic Organization (1998)

Richard N. Langlois: Competition through Institutional Form: the Case of Cluster Tool Standards (2004)

Keld Laursen and Ammon J. Salter: The Paradox of Openness. Appropriability and the Use of External Sources of Knowledge for Innovation (2007)

William Lazonick: The Theory of Innovative Enterprise: Organization of Innovation in the Learning Economy (2000)

Keun Lee: Succesive Changes in Industry Leadership and Catch-up by Asia (2016)

Michael Lenox: Interdependencies, Competitive Dynamics, and Firm Choice of Innovation Policy (2009)

Aija Leiponen: Cooperative standard-setting strategies in wireless telecommunications (2006)

Daniel A. Levinthal: Revisiting the Problem of Organizational Goals: From Problems of Con ict to Problems of Direction (2011)

Arie Y. Lewin and Silvia Massini: Knowledge Creation and Organizational Capabilities of Innovating and Imitating Firms (2003)

Hila Lifshitz-Assaf: Dismantling Knowledge Boundaries at NASA: The impact on R&D professionals, problem formulation and locus of innovation (2017)

Patrick Llerena: The Theory of the Firm in an Evolutionary Perspective: a Critical Development (1998)

Patrick Llerena and Mireille Matt: Technological Cooperation and Dynamic Performance of Industries: Towards an Evolutionary Foundation of Technology Policies (1999)

Brian J. Loasby: Decision Premises and Economic Organisation (1998)

Brian J. Loasby: Cognition and the Growth of Knowledge (2001)

Bengt-Åke Lundvall: Industrial Dynamics in a small open economy (1997)

Bengt-Åke Lundvall: National Innovation Systems – from Evolutionary Concept to Development Tool (2005)

Bengt-Åke Lundvall and Jesper Lindgaard Christensen: Extending and Deepening the Analysis of Innovation Systems – with Empirical Illustrations from the DISKO Project (1999)

Bengt-Åke Lundvall, Bjoern Johnson, Esben S. Andersen and Bent Dalum: National systems of production, innovation and competence-building (2001)

Anoop Madhok: Cost, Value, and the Management of Interfirm Collaborations (1998)

Franco Malerba: Knowledge Proximity and Technological Diversification (1998)

Franco Malerba: New Challenges for the European Sectoral System of Innovation (2002)

Franco Malerba and Timothy Bresnahan: Industrial Dynamics and the Evolution of Firms’ and nations’ Competitive Capabilities in the World Computer Industry
(1997)

Franco Malerba and Luigi Orsenigo: The Dynamics of Innovation and Market Structure in the Evolution of the Pharmaceutical Industry: A History Friendly Model (2001)

Jacques Mairesse and Pierre Mohnen: Accounting for Innovation and productivity: A 
Comparison Across Four European Countries (2002)

Robin Mansell: Relocations of Competition in the field of Information and Communications Technology (1997)

Luigi Marengo: Interdependencies and Division of Labor in Problem Solving Techniques (1998)

Luigi Marengo: Knowledge, Competition and Appropriability: Is strong IPR protection always needed for more and better Innovations?
(2007)

Anita M. McGahan: The effect of Industry and location on Firm Profitability in the Global Market: Empirical Evidence that Firm Performance Depends on the Interaction between Industry Affiliation and Country Identity (2006)

Anita M. McGahan: The More the Merrier: Institutions and Syndicate Size in Venture Capital investments (2007)

Anita M. McGahan and Brian S. Silverman : Innovation and Competition (2003)

Stan Metcalfe: Competitive and Comparative Advantage: (Rough) Notes Toward an Evolutionary Approach to Growth and Foreign Trade (1999)

Stan Metcalfe: The Evolution of Industrial Dynamics (2006)

David Mowery: The Changing structure of inventive activity and process innovation in the global semiconductor industry, 1994-2004 (2006)

David Mowery and Stuart Graham: Submarines and Strategy in Firms’ Intellectual Property Portfolios: Continuations in Software Patents (2002)

David Mowery and Timothy Simcoe: Is the Internet a U.S. Invention? An Economic and Technological History of Computer Networking (2001)

Johann Peter Murmann: The Complex Role of Patents in Creating Technological Competencies (2007)

Lynn Mytelka and Michel Delapierre: Industrial Dynamics, Knowledge-Based Networked Oligopolies and the Emergence of New Modes of Competition
(1997)

Sadao Nagaoka: An analysis of unilateral and cross-licensing: new evidence from the inventor survey in Japan (2008)

Ramana Nanda: Democratizing Entry: Banking Deregulations, Financing 
Constraints and Entrepreneurship (2008)

Richard R. Nelson: Knowledge and Innovation Systems (1999)

Jack Nickerson: Toward an Economizing Theory of Strategy (1998)

Jack Nickerson: Designing a Dynamic Capability for Strategic Problem Formulation (2010)

Bart Nooteboom: Competence in Mutual Dependence (1998)

Bart Nooteboom: Network embeddedness and the exploration of novel technologies: technological distance, betweenness  centrality and density (2006)

Joanne Oxley: Alliance structure and the scope of knowledge transfer: Evidence from US-Japan agreements (2007)

Pari Patel and Keith Pavitt: National Systems of Innovation under Strain: The Internationalisation of Corporate R & D (1999)

Keith Pavitt: Technologies, Products and Organisation in the Innovating Firm: What Adam Smith Tells us and Joseph Schumpeter Doesn’t (1998)

Keith Pavitt: Knowledge about Knowledge since Nelson & Winter: A mixed record (2001)

Keith Pavitt: System Integrators as “post-industrial” firms? (2002)

Markus Perkmann: Why do academics engage with industry? the entrepreneurial university and individual motivations (2009)

Pascal Petit and Bruno Amable: On the development paths of innovation systems (2001)

Eric Pfaffman: How Does a Product Influence the Boundaries of the Firm? (1998)

Corey Phelps: Take a Chance on Me: An Examination of the Interdependence of Start-up Tie Formation Across Venture Capital and Alliance Networks (2011)

Hart E. Posen: The Power of Imperfect Imitation (2011)

Jaideep Prabhu: Patterns in the Global Location of R&D Centres by the World’s Largest Firms: The Role of India and China (2010)

Phanish Puranam: Expeditions Without Maps: Why Faulty Initial Representations May Be Useful In Joint Discovery Problems (2010)

David Mitchel Reeb: Family Firms: Diversification and Leverage (2016)

Guido Reger: European Technolgy Policy and Internationalization: An Analysis against the Background of the International Innovation Strategies of Multinational Enterprises (1998)

George B. Richardson: Competition, Innovation and Increasing Returns (1997)

George B. Richardson: Production, Planning and Prices (1998)

George B. Richardson: Evolution, Structure and Strategy (2001)

George B. Richardson: The Organization of Industry Revisited (2003)

Lori Rosenkopf: All about that context: Replicating and generalizing innovation research (2018)

Cristina Rossi-Lamastra: Absorbing knowledge from unconventional sources. How collaborations with the Open Source community shape the innovation performance of entrepreneurial ventures (2011)

Michael Ryall: The Two Sides of Competition and their Effect on the Economic Performance of Organizations (2009)

Charles F. Sabel: Reconfiguring industrial policy: A framework with an application to South Africa (2008)

Mariko Sakakibara: Assessing the Role of University Patent Rights: U.S.-Japan Comparison of University-Industry Knowledge Transfer
(2007)

Mari Sako: Governing Supplier Parks: Leveraging the benefits of Outsourcing and Co-location (2005)

Ron Sanchez: Uncertainty, Flexibility and Economic Organization: Foundations for an Option Theory of the Firm (1998)

Filipe Santos: From Social Entrepreneurship to Social Innovation?
(2015)

AnnaLee Saxenian: Venture Capital in the “Periphery:” The New Argonauts, 
Global Search and Local Institution Building (2008)

Melissa Schilling: Technology Shocks and Technological Collaboration (2012)

Hubert Schmitz: Local Upgrading in Global Chains (2004)

Angelo Secchi and Giulio Bottazzi: Gibrat’s Law and Diversification (2006)

Brian Silverman: Lateral Dominance and Fringe Benefits: Strategic Dynamics Among Dominant and Fringe Firms (2006)

Keith Smith: Innovation, Growth and Industrial Structure: Issues for Policy (1999)

Keith Smith: What is the ‘knowledge economy’? Knowledge-intensive industries and distributed knowledge bases (2001)

Olav Sorenson: Social Networks and the Persistence of Clusters: Evidence from the computer workstation industry (2004)

Olav Sorenson: Complexity, Networks and Knowledge flows (2005)

Olav Sorenson: Home sweet home? Entrepreneurs’ location choices and the performance of their ventures (2007)

Olav Sorenson: Institutional Investors and the Supply of Private Equity (2011)

Olav Sorenson: Do startups create good jobs? (2016)

Daniel Snow: Demand Heterogeneity and Graceful Technology Retreats: a New Perspective on Responding to Dominant Technological Threats
(2009)

David Stark: Dissonance for discovery (2016)

Ed Steinmueller: The Evolution of Competitive Advantage in the Global Semiconductor Industry: 1947-1996 (1997)

Ed Steinmueller: The Changing Locus of Learning Activities in the Firm and the Role of Information and Communication Technologies (2000)

Scott Stern: Does Formal Intellectual Property Impact the Market for Scientific Collaboration?: Evidence from Patent-Paper Pairs (2006)

Scott Stern: Patents, Papers & Privacy: The disclosure of scientific and 
commercial knowledge (2008)

Claude Serfati and Francois Chesnais: Long Horizon Investment under a Globalised Finance Dominated Accumulation Regime: An Interpretation of the Levelling Off and Decline of R&D in the 1990s
(1997)

Michael Storper: Social Impacts of Globalization: Production, Consumption and Inequality in Global Context (1997)

Michael Storper: The Geographical Processes behind Innovation: A Europe-United States Comparative Analysis (2007)

Michael Storper: Society, Community and Economic Development: A Tale of Two Regions (2004)

Michael Storper: The Economics of Context (2008)

Michael Storper and Yun-chung Chen: Globalization, Localization, and Knowledge Flows (1999)

Michael Storper and Anthony J. Venables: Buzz: Face-to-Face Contact and 
the Contemporary Economy (2003)

Toby Stuart: The judgment of pairs (2014)

Jesper B. Sørensen: Peer effects in entrepreneurship (2006)

Jesper B. Sørensen: Competence and Commitment: Employer Size and 
Entrepreneurial Endurance (2008)

Anne ter Wal and Paola Criscuolo: Division of networks and innovation (2017)

Bruce Tether: Turning Digital: Diversication in UK Design Consultancy Services (2010)

Morris Teubal: Restructuring and Embeddness of the Business Sector: A Systems of Innovation Perspective on Diffusion Policy (1997)

Marie Thursby, Jerry Thursby and Emmanuel Dechenaux: Shirking, Sharing Risk and Shelving: The Role of University Licence Contracts (2005)

Brian Uzzi: The Science of Science: Collaboration strategies for improving scientific impact (2018)

Bart Verspagen: The Role of Large Multinationals in the Dutch Technology Infrastructure: A Patent Citation Analysis (1999)

Bart Verspagen and Claudia Werker
: What Do We Know About the Invisible College of the Economics of Innovation and Technological Change? (2003)

Jerome Vicente and Raphael Suire: Why do some places succeed when others decline: A social interaction model of cluster viability (2008)

Eric von Hippel: The Major Role of Clinicians in the Discovery of Off-Label Drug Therapies (2007)

David Waguespack: Status, Quality and Attention: What’s in a (Missing) Name? (2010)

Birger Wernerfelt: Efficient Adaptation versus Gains from Specialization: Procuring Labor Services (2011)

Oliver E. Williamson: Strategic Management and Core Competences: A Transaction Cost Economics Perspective (1998)

Sidney G. Winter: Evolutionary Production Theory:Principles and Elements (1998)

Sidney G. Winter: Replicating Organizational Knowledge: Principles or Templates? (2006)

Sidney G. Winter: The Role of Scale Adjustment in Industry Dynamics (2009)

Ulrich Witt: Between Entrepreneurial Leadership and Managerial Governance: The Contingent Ontogeny of the Firm Organization (1998)

Ulrich Witt: The Development of Firms and the Evolution of Markets – The Entrepreneurial Role Reconsidered (2001)

Ulrich Witt and Christian Zellner: Knowledge-based Entrepreneurship: The Organizational Side of Technology Commercialization (2005)

Lan Xue: Integration into the Global Innovation System: the Roles of Universities in China (2009)

Shaker A. Zahra: Entrepreneurial Capability: Opportunity Pursuit and Game Changing (2011)

Shaker A. Zahra: Entrepreneurship and Sustainability: Growing a Field of Dreams (2015)

Ivo Zander: The International Entrepreneurial Dynamics of Accelerated Internationalization (2006)

Rosemarie Ziedonis: Job-hopping in the shadow of patent enforcement” (2011)

Christoph Zott: The Affective Roots of Resource-based Theory: How Founders’ Emotion Regulation Enables Resource Creation In Firms (2010)

John Zysman: Production and Competition in a Digital Era (2004)

Thomas Åstebro: Does it pay to be a Jack-of-all-trades? (2005)

DRUID debates

See the most recent DRUID debates in hi-res video.


DRUID Debate on ‘Design Thinking’
Do recent developments in design thinking represent a major advance in our understanding of innovation, strategy and entrepreneurship over traditional approaches? (2019)
YES: Dimo Dimov and Roberto Verganti
NO: Dan Levinthal and Sarah Kaplan

DRUID Debate on the ‘Eco-Systems Approach’ Is a conceptualization of the competitive environment without an eco-systems approach flawed? (2019)
YES: Annabelle Gawer and Michael Jacobides
NO: Nilanjana Dutt and Stefano Brusoni

DRUID Debate on ‘Star Scientists’: Is the focus on ‘star scientists’ in science and innovation policy misplaced and detrimental to development of effective policies for economic development? (2018)
YES: Jason Owen-Smith and Aldo Geuna
NO: Catherine Beaudrey and Alexander Oettl

DRUID Debate on Community Innovation Survey Data: Is it time to move on from using Community Innovation Survey data, since it is facing strong diminishing returns for empirical research to advance our knowledge on firm-level innovation? (2018)
YES: Bruce Tether and Reinhilde Veugelers
NO: Ashish Arora and Aija Leiponen

DRUID Panel on Deglobalization: How may current policy trends towards protectionism impact innovation, entrepreneurship and industrial dynamics? (2017)
Juan Alcacer, Anita McGahan, Ram Mudambi and Michael Storper

DRUID Debate on Practice Engagement and Research: Is research targeted at the practitioner audience unlikely to lead to scientific breakthroughs in the innovation, entrepreneurship and strategy field? (2017)
YES: John Cantwell and Tina Ambos
NO: Andy van de Ven and Rita Gunther McGrath

DRUID Debate on The Dual Requirement of a Theoretical and an Empirical Contribution: Is the requirement of a theoretical and empirical contribution within the same paper damaging to scientific progress in the innovation, entrepreneurship and strategy field? (2017)
YES: Michelle Gittelman and Rich Bettis
NO: Oliver Alexy and Martin Kilduff

DRUID Debate on Econometric Identification: Despite merits in terms of clarifying the limitations of many empirical results, is the current imperative regarding econometric identification leading innovation scholars to focus on a too narrow set of questions? (2016)
YES: Karin Hoisl and Will Mitchell
NO: Timothy Simcoe and David Waguespack

DRUID Debate on The Journal Impact Factor: Has the Journal Impact Factor now lost all of its credibility? (2016)
YES: Diana Hicks and Ben Martin
NO: Wilfred Mijnhardt and Barend van der Meulen

DRUID Debate on IPR and Emerging Economies: Are tight international IPR regimes crucially harmful to emerging export-led economies? (2016)
YES: Kwanghui Lim and Paak Liang Png
NO: Chang Chieh Hang and Margaret Kyle

DRUID Debate on Asian Innovation Systems: Is there a unique Asian system of innovation (or management or business)?(2016)
NO: Wong Poh Kam and Chris Tucci
YES: Gerry George and Henry Yeung

DRUID Debate on Business Model Innovation: Is the current focus on business models and business model innovation misplaced and offers little new to our understanding of strategy and general management? (2015)
YES: Anne Marine Knott and Robert Grant
NO: Chris Tucci and Joan E. Ricart

DRUID Debate on Entrepreneurship Policy: Are policy efforts to encourage more people to become entrepreneurs generally wrong? (2015, Published as a paper in Small Business Economics, 47/1: 35-51)
YES: Thomas Åstebro and David Robinson
NO: Zoltan Acs and David Audretch

DRUID Debate on Innovative China: Will China become the leading innovative power in the world in 2040? (2014)
YES: Marina Yue Zhang and Ram Mudambi
NO: Scott Stern and Daniele Archibugi

DRUID Debate on Patents on Business Methods or Software: Do patents on software and business methods significantly retard technological and economic progress? (2014)
YES: Joachim Henkel and Mike Meurer
NO: Stuart Graham and Jay P. Kesan

DRUID Debate on Strategy: Do analyses based on conventional measures of financial performance lead to poor strategic decisions about innovative projects? (2013)
YES: Siney G. Winter and Bruce Kogut
NO: Anita McGahan and Rebecca Henderson

DRUID Debate on Scientific Fraud: Is the academic system is effective at self-policing, so that fraud and other research misconduct is kept to a minimum and research integrity is maintained? (2013)
YES: Julia I. Lane and Jeff Furman
NO: Dietmar Harhoff and Ben Martin

DRUID Debate on Systems of Innovation: Is the systems of innovation approach no longer a promising line of research? (2013)
YES: Maryann Feldman and Ammon Salter
NO: Dan Breznitz and Martin Kenney

DRUID Debate on IPR and Growth: Are (the current structure of) intellectual property rights a serious impediment to economic progress? (2012)
YES: Eric von Hippel and Georg Von Krogh
NO: Vincenzo Denicolo’ and Scott Stern

DRUID Debate on Exploration/Exploitation: Is the exploration/exploitation trade-off a helpful metaphor, but with little value in informing research that is relevant to organizations/managers? (2012)
YES: Marco Giarratana and Lori Rosenkopf
NO: John Cantwell and Ram Mudambi

DRUID Debate on Neoclassical Economics and Innovation: Does mainstream neoclassical economic theory not contribute positively to innovation studies? (2012)
YES: Giovanni Dosi and Sid Winter
NO: Paul Stoneman and Otto Toivanen

DRUID Debate on Social Corporate Responsibility: Are there few firm investments in social values or corporate social responsibility without the aim of value creation? (2011)
YES: Andrea Fosfuri and Jean Philippe Bonardi
NO: Shawn Berman and Stephen Brammer

DRUID Debate on the Role of Empirical Research: Is the primary role of empirical researchers to test theories? (2011)
YES: Michael Ryall and Gerard George
NO: Michael Jensen and Michelle Gittelman

DRUID Debate on Entrepreneurship: Is a significant part of entrepreneurship innate? (2010)
YES: Nicolas Nicolau and Scott Shane
NO: Alfonso Gambardella and Peter Thompson

DRUID Debate on University Patenting: Does university patenting increasingly impede knowledge sharing and overall economic growth? (2010)
YES: Martin Kenney and Arvids A. Ziedonis
NO: Marie Thusby and Ben Martin

DRUID Debate on Prediction: Does the notion of prediction have high value as a criterion for research in social sciences? (2009)
YES: Will Mitchell and Anne Marie Knott
NO: Geoffrey M. Hodgson and Paul Nightingale

DRUID Debate on Evolutionary Processes: Does empirical evidence on industrial dynamics favor organizational ecology? (2009)
YES: Laszlo Polos and Stanislav D. Dobrev
NO: Giovanni Dosi and Bart Verspagen

DRUID Debate on Patents as Measure of Innovation: In order to improve the quality and impact of empirical research on industry dynamics, should we discourage the use of patent data to measure innovation? (2008)
YES: Maryann Feldman and Myriam Mariani
NO: Joanne Oxley and Bronwyn Hall

DRUID Debate on Networks and Innovation: Are network dynamics an essential variable in any explanation of innovation? (2008)
YES: Walter W Powell and Jason Owen-Smith
NO: Francesco Lissoni and Elaine Romanelli

DRUID Debate on The Scientific Value of Game Theory: Have sophisticated analyses based on game theory made no significant contribution to the understanding of real questions of business strategy? (2008)
YES: Sidney G. Winter and Dan Lovallo
NO: Bruno Cassiman and Peter Zemsky

DRUID Debate on Methodological Individualism versus Scientific Progress: Does the lack of methodological individualism applied in strategy research seriously limit scientific progress in the field? (2007)
YES: Peter Abell and Nicolai Foss
NO: Sidney G. Winter and Thorbjørn Knudsen

DRUID Debate on Dynamic Capabilities and Adaptation: Does the study of dynamic capabilities leads to a dead end and rather, to further our understanding of firm performance we need to study organizational adaptation rather than dynamic capabilities? (2007)
YES: Dan Levinthal and William C Ocasio
NO: Gautam Ahuja and Kathleen Eisenhardt

DRUID Debate on Social Networks and Clusters: Do social networks play a crucial role in facilitating regional economic development and the emergence and persistence of industrial clusters? (2006)
YES: Olav Sorenson and Jesper B. Sørensen
NO: Alfonso Gambardella and Scott Stern

DRUID Debate on Users and Innovation: Are users the primary source of innovations in the economy and is the central role of business firms therefore to enable and harness these users’ innovations rather than trying to innovate for them?
(2006)
YES: Dietmar Harhoff and Lars Bo Jeppesen.
NO: Deborah Dougherty and Gautam Ahuja

DRUID Debate on Open Innovation: Is Open Innovation a broadly expanding new paradigm in managing innovation implying that the scope for tight appropriability regimes and core competencies is decreasing? (2005)
YES: Henry Chesbrough and Richard N. Langlois.
NO: Constance Helfat and Ammon Salter

DRUID Debate on Offshoring Intellectual Labour: Is offshoring intellectual labour the first stage in the true globalisation of innovation and the end to the knowledge-based comparative advantage of currently developed countries? (2005)
YES: Daniele Archibugi and Suma S. Athreye
NO: Michael Storper and Meric Gertler

DRUID Debate on Firm Strategy or Industry Affiliation: Is industry structure a central determinant of firm performance, and is the scope for firm strategy limited accordingly? (2005)
YES: Anita McGahan and Janet Bercovitz.
NO: Alfonso Gambardella and Sidney Winter

DRUID Roundtable on Absorptive Capacity of Innovation Systems with Focus on the Role of University in Economic Development (2004)
Rajneesh Narula, Richard R. Nelson, and Jose Cassiolato

DRUID Roundtable on Sharing and Protecting Knowledge: Is there a Need for New Rules for the Global Game of Intellectual property? (2003)
Bengt-Åke Lundvall, Birgitte Andersen, Benjamin Coriat, Ove Granstrand and Bronwyn Hall

DRUID Roundtable on Benchmarking National Innovation Systems and RTD-Policy Learning in Europe: Consequences and Recommendations for Industrial and Technology Policies in the Wake of the Danish EU Presidency (2002)
Bengt-Åke Lundvall, Nikolaos Kastrinos, David Mowery,
Dominique Foray,
Kim Brinckman and Jens Nyholm

DRUID Roundtable on The Contribution of Evolutionary Economics to Economics and Social Science (2001)
Richard N. Nelson, Sidney G. Winter and young DRUID scholars

DRUID Roundtable on The New Economy and International Benchmarking (2001)
Richard N. Nelson, Jørgen Rosted, Keith Pavitt, Nobuo Tanaka and David Teece

DRUID Roundtable on Theoretical Perspectives of Industrial Dynamics (2001)
Sidney G. Winter, Mashiko Aoki, Giovanni Dosi, Brian Loasby and Luc
Soete

DRUID Roundtable on Capturing and Communicating Productive Knowledge (2000)
Brian Loasby, Sidney G. Winter, Alice Lam, Keith Smith, George B. Richardson and Ed Steinmueller.

DRUID Roundtable on Policy Perspectives on Learning and Knowledge with Focus on Learning Organisations and Labour Market Dynamics (2000)
Bengt-Åke Lundvall, Kurt Larsen, Ned Lorenz, Bent Dalum, Keith Smith and Alice Lam

DRUID Roundtable on Competences and Transaction Costs (1998)
Oliver Williamson, Sidney G. Winter, Brian Loasby, Bengt-Åke Lundvall,
George B. Richardson, Jay Barney and Giovanni Dosi

DRUID Roundtable on The Implications of Globalisation, the Learning Economy and the Information Society for Competition Policy (1997)
Bo Carlsson, Svend Hylleberg, Finn Lauritzen, George B. Richardson, Ed Steinmueller, Bengt-Åke Lundvall and Lynn Mytelka

DRUID Roundtable on New trends in the Research on Industrial Dynamics (1996)
Christopher Freeman and Franco Malerba

DRUID Roundtable on Changes in the Production and use of Knowledge with Focus on the Codification Trend (1996)
Patric Llerena, Massimo Columbo, Dominique Foray, Brian Loasby, Sidney G. Winter and Paul Nightingale

DRUID Roundtable on Industrial policy in the Learning Economy (1996)
Jacques DeBandt, Jørgen Rosted, Morris Teubal, Keith Smith, Luc Soete and Nobuo Tanaka